Tuesday, 28 August 2012

Heidi Video Interview about meeting MKS - Yahoo OMG







Heidi at Vita Liberata lounge , V Festival




The gorgeous @heidi_range stopped by to see us #vitaliberata @VMLouderLounge



Cool Babe HEIDI RANGE- Daily Star


COOL BABE HEIDI RANGE

ABOVE: Heidi Range and Jessica Brown at V Festival
“
Everything’s fine, there’s no awkwardness
”
Heidi Range
20th August 2012

By Jessica Brown with Francine Anker

A CATFIGHT could have been on the cards when Scouse popstrel Heidi Range, 29, bumped into ex-Sugababe Keisha Buchanan, 27.

But the blonde, revealed: “Everything’s fine, there’s no awkwardness.”

Wednesday, 22 August 2012

Jade's Beautiful Curls unlocked plus exciting news

 
Me and my curls set FREE!! Ready for bed :)
 
I like to draw portraits, here's one that I recently did..

Two of my Pencil portraits finished,

Not only did Jade share her Hair freedom on Twitter tonight , but also her talent for Drawing as you can see above. Jade also announced that she is "currently in talks about an acting project now :) exciting!!" - This would be a very exciting time for Jade as she is also writing songs as well. Busy , busy busy ! ~ JEF

Friday, 17 August 2012

Gorgeous Jade in the park with Black cat




Me and a cute little cat that wanted to be friends in the park today :)

OK! Chats to Mollie King,Scott Maslen and Heidi Range at the WTA Pre-Wimbledon Party



OK! Chats to Mollie King, Cheska Hull, Scott Maslen 

and Heidi Range at the WTA Pre-Wimbledon Party



Published on 22 Jun 2012 by 
We [http://www.ok.co.uk] caught up with Mollie King at the WTA pre-Wimbledon party who revealed that there is a new single coming out in a few months as well as The Saturdays gigging around the UK during the summer months. Rochelle and Vanessa are currently away in Africa this week for Comic Relief.
We also caught with Cheska Hull (Made In Chelsea), Scott Maslen (EasterEnders) and Heidi Range.

Presenter - Emma Pollard
Camera, editor and Producer - Julian Coleman
Co-Producer - Stacey Waterman

Serett Productions http://www.serettproductions.com;http://www.facebook.com/serettproductions

Leggy Jade Gif found by Elliot





 Heheh you reblogged that from me! I am :) x


 aw heyyy elliot!!! yes it was you :) thank you.. now i am sharing it with everyone on here xxx


And now I am sharing it on my blog :-) - JEF

Amelle , Jade and Friend on the Beach in Barbados


 Gary Sewell
 I think I have to win with this one taken in Barbados with Sugababes  and  x


Wednesday, 15 August 2012

Jade Ewen back on Twitter

Just sayin hi. It's been a while..



hey hey.. I know ive been rubbish on here lately.. if I'm honest twitter does my head in.. but i am going to make an extra effort to be online more often.. how is everyone..?

ah nice to see you're all happy and well.. :) missed you guys too.. random but i got a bite from a mosquito last night and my arm is swolen and very itchy! im the worst for not scratching too...

ok just gona go watch some inbetweeners.. be back tomo xx


Monday, 13 August 2012

Suga dumped: More dramas for the Sugababes as they reform as MKS - Daily Mirror


Suga dumped: More dramas for the Sugababes as they reform as MKS

Mutya, Keisha and Siobhan prove they lost none of their feistiness while they were away by giving their shocked manager the boot


New image: The girls have reformed as MKS
New image: The girls have reformed as MKS















in their former professional lives as the Sugababes they were plagued with dramas.
And now it appears there’s more turbulence in the lives of Mutya, Keisha and Siobhan as the group gets back ­together.
I can reveal the girls have parted ways with manager Felix Howard, the man who got them to reform and give it all a shot a second time.
Sources claim Felix was fired, ­although the girls’ PR rep Shoshanna Stone insists it was a “mutual parting of ways”.
My mole told me: “The girls got rid of him – there’s no two ways about it. They didn’t think things were working out and wanted to get a new manager. Everyone was really shocked.
“Felix knows how to manage a band and is a good guy for the job. But they wouldn’t have it and thought best to get a new manager before they started releasing the new music. There’s no bad blood.”
The original Sugababes line-up of Mutya Buena, Keisha Buchanan and Siobhan ­Donaghy – or MKS as they’re now known – have signed a new record deal with Polydor Records and have three possible lead singles ready to go in the coming months.
Now don’t get me wrong – I’m bubbling with ­excitement for this comeback. They can sing, cut it live and have a chance at chart glory. But they have got to pull it together without these dramz.
Felix wrote their debut hit Overload and was widely considered to be behind the gritty early sound of the band. Now they are ­searching for the right person to guide them back from the dead.
Another source said: “They were looking for a manager to co-manage with Felix but it seemed better to find one rather than two.”
I’m sitting well on the fence on that but I reckon MKS stand a great chance.

MKS team up with Shaznay Lewis of All Saints for new album!


The original Sugababes team up with Shaznay Lewis of All Saints for new album!

The original Sugababes – or Mutya Keisha Siobhan –  have recently tweeted that they’re officially in the studio writing with the one and only Shaznay Lewis from All Saints. If you are a fan of this blog you know that we are totally in love with this girl and her debut album Open. The “Origibabes” also confirmed that they did write a song with Shaznay in November  but not in the studio together. Let’s hope for a slow number on this one. Oh, and guest vocals please! 

Friday, 10 August 2012

Original Sugababes Mutya Keisha Siobhan finish new album - Digital Spy


Original Sugababes Mutya Keisha Siobhan finish new album

 | By Lewis Corner 

Mutya Keisha Siobhan have confirmed that their new album is complete.

The girl group - who originally started out as the Sugababes - announced their reunion last month, but insisted that new material won't be released until 2013.

Mutya Keisha Siobhan


However, the trio recently hinted that their new collection was nearly finished and have now indicated that the entire set is complete.

"With the girls in the studio. I think the album is finished!!!" Siobhan Donaghy tweeted, before adding: "Whoop!"

Mutya Keisha Siobhan have worked with a range of producers and songwriters including Emeli Sandé, Naughty Boy, ex-All Saints singer Shaznay Lewis and MNEK.

Keisha Buchanan recently wished the current Sugagabes lineup - which includes Heidi Range, Amelle Berrabah and Jade Ewen - "the best of luck" and insisted that there are no hard feelings.

Tuesday, 7 August 2012

Will the real Sugababes please stand up? - The Independent


Will the real Sugababes please stand up?

The original line-up have reunited, but will have to call themselves something else. So how can they overcome the marketing challenge? Elisa Bray looks at the precedents





The original Sugababes have reunited and are back in the studio, but they're no longer called the Sugababes because that name is now taken by the new incarnation of the group. In a confusing and, perhaps, unprecedented situation in pop music, the original trio who made the Sugababes famous have had to rename themselves Mutya Keisha Siobhan.

he original Sugababes have reunited and are back in the studio, but they're no longer called the Sugababes because that name is now taken by the new incarnation of the group. In a confusing and, perhaps, unprecedented situation in pop music, the original trio who made the Sugababes famous have had to rename themselves Mutya Keisha Siobhan.
When Keisha Buchanan left the Sugababes in 2009 and was replaced by solo singer Jade Ewen, she was the final original member to leave the pop group. Yet still, the group kept the name Sugababes, leading critics to question how it was possible for a band to retain its name and status as a serious pop act despite having an entirely different line-up – perhaps the only other band to do so (and still exist) is Renaissance, which the former Yardbirds members Keith Relf and Jim McCarty launched in 1969 and already had an entirely new line-up by 1971.
The very fact that Sugababes continue proves how successful a manufactured pop act can be; the brand name is more important than the make-up of the personalities of its members. To long-standing fans of the original band, the name Mutya Keisha Siobhan will be instantly recognisable – to new fans it's a bit of a mouthful. Not that the trio, who are currently working on a new album set for release early next year, seem too perturbed. They've pointed out that when they formed as 16-year-old teenagers in 1998, they took on the name Sugababes so they didn't have to use their first names.
In a recent interview, Keisha said to Mutya: "I found a clip of you when you're 16 and they ask you why we came up with the name 'Sugababes'. And you go: 'Well we had to have a band name because we couldn't have people just calling us Mutya, Keisha, Siobhan'."
The pop world continues to be peppered with bands who have changed their names for legal or other reasons. Most recently, the rising indie band Brother faced a challenge from a 20-year-old didgeridoo and bagpipe-wielding Australian Celtic rock trio of the same name. The Slough four-piece became UK Brother before settling on Viva Brother last year, although clearly the name alteration affected their sense of identity and their rise – the band split up a few months later. In June the band reformed and reinvented themselves entirely with the new name Lovelife, abandoning their grit-pop sound for slower-paced synth-pop.
When the Californian power-pop band The Morning Benders changed their name to POP ETC earlier this year, it wasn't because of a legal challenge, but the reaction from fans; they were horrified to discover that in the UK "bender" is a slang term describing gay people. "In a lot of ways it was the perfect time to change it," their frontman Chris Chu says. "We had just finished making an album that was completely different than anything we had made before, and it matched our new-found perspective. It felt positive to start this phase of our musical lives with a new name, because in many ways it affords you a new start. When we first named our band The Morning Benders we never thought it would be a band we would all be playing in five or six years later. POP ETC aligns itself more closely with where we are. It's given us a unique chance to tell people we absolutely love pop music and believe in its power to affect people."
There were some negatives to the name change, though, one being the idea that changing their name meant they had "sold out" or betrayed their fans. "That was incredibly frustrating," Chu says. "At the end of the day our old band name and the "brand" one might associate with it was incredibly more profitable financially than a new name no one had heard of."
The biggest downside is what faces all acts when they change name: making sure their fans know about it. But it's early days. "We still get stopped on the street by people asking about our old band name," Chu says.
Others have made the name change less willingly. Suede were at their peak in the UK in 1993 – their self-titled debut album had sold 100,000 copies in its first week – and they were hoping, unsuccessfully, to make it in America after they secured a tour slot with The Cranberries. It can't have helped that at that time a lawsuit arrived from a US lounge singer by the same name, forcing them to drop the trademarked name Suede, so they became The London Suede, only serving to reinforce their Britishness and further distance them from potential US fans.
"The London Suede is not the name I chose for the band," singer Brett Anderson said a few years later. "I didn't change it happily, and I'm not going to pretend I did." Recalling the incident, bassist Mat Osman says: "The whole thing was a bit of a mess really. The first we knew of it was a letter to the American record company telling us that we needed to change our name to 'Brett Anderson and the British Band Formerly Known as Suede'. We weren't too keen on that and riposted with The London Suede, a name which I think even then we all hated and as the years have gone by have grown to like even less. It feels wrong, and parochial and just plain ugly." Although Osman doesn't feel it impacted directly on their success, it certainly made them less keen on performing there.
"Much as I'd love to blame our lack of US No 1 singles on people heading for the 'S' section of record stores, seeing nothing between the Subways and Supergrass, and just buying something else instead, I don't think it made a huge difference to our sales. It did make us less keen on touring there though. It looks rubbish on record sleeves, too."
Changing names didn't do the Chemical Brothers any harm when the dance duo had to switch from their initial moniker Dust Brothers after the US hip-hop producers discovered them. It will be interesting to see how Mutya Keisha Siobhan distinguish themselves from the current Sugababes – and whether they end up shortening their name to the more manageable MKS.

Wednesday, 1 August 2012

Bullied and depressed she walked out on the Sugababes in 2001: So just what has made Siobhán Donaghy reunite with Keisha and Mutya?


Bullied and depressed she walked out on the Sugababes in 2001: So just what has made Siobhán Donaghy reunite with Keisha and Mutya?

By Richard Price
|
Forgiven, but not forgotten: Siobhan Donaghy left the band in 2001 but has joined forced with the original Sugababes
Forgiven, but not forgotten: Siobhan Donaghy left the band in 2001 but has joined forced with the original Sugababes
Judging by recent form, Siobhán Donaghy has eyes for only two people on this planet - and neither of them are male. Forget the hormonal urges of your average 20-something beauty.
For this stunning redhead, nobody can bring her so much happiness as her best friends Mutya Buena and Keisha Buchanan.
The living embodiment of Girl Power, the original Sugababes have been sharing every last detail of their lives lately. Whether taking photographs of Mutya cheering on the Olympic torch in the western suburbs of London or painting Keisha's nails a fetching shade of red, white and blue, Siobhán in particular has gone out of her way to reinforce the bonds of friendship.
There is only one problem with this picture: the fact that a short while ago these 'best friends' were more like sworn enemies.
Siobhán in particular - always something of an outsider with her natural Irish beauty in conflict with her bandmates' tougher urban style - made little secret of the fact that she was waiting for karma to 'come round and bite them in the a***'.
Tough talk, but then this is the same feisty young woman who walked out on the Sugababes just at the point when they were about to hit the platinum-selling big time, citing chronic bullying as a reason.
Never one to mince her words, she accused Keisha of driving her to the brink of a nervous breakdown. It is a matter of public record that the stress of being a Sugababe resulted in Siobhán being prescribed antidepressants and becoming so low that she wanted to leave the music business altogether.
That was then, however, and a decade on all has been forgiven, if not quite forgotten. Hence their excited Twitter announcement. Just ten days ago, Keisha posted a picture of the trio online - proudly declaring that the original line-up of the band would be reuniting.
In an age of seemingly endless pop group reunions it is tempting to dismiss it as yet another swift cash-in on past glories. But to make such an assumption would be short-sighted.
There is the small matter of a €1.2million contract to make a new record which shows categorically that, unlike some lesser rivals, the Sugababes have a genuine pedigree and a rock-solid fanbase which has been clamouring for a reunion for some time.
Indeed, contrary to contemporaries such as Atomic Kitten and All Saints, they have never been regarded as anything other than a credible act staffed with genuinely gifted singers.
For Mutya (whose mother is also of Irish descent) and Keisha, who both banked seven-figure sums during the golden years of the Noughties, this is another bite of the cherry.
For 28-year-old Siobhán, however, it represents much more than that.
Back together: The original Sugababes, now named Mutya, Keisha and Siobhan show they're back to the best of friends as they travel to the Olympics Opening Ceremony
Back together: The original Sugababes, now named Mutya, Keisha and Siobhan show they're back to the best of friends as they travel to the Olympics Opening Ceremony
As one long-standing ally put it to me this week, the reunion marks: 'The kind of opportunity for redemption which only comes along once in a lifetime, if you're lucky. 'Siobhán is a strong character, and she has never let her spirits drop for long, but she is desperate to show the world her talent as an artist. She's had critical acclaim since the age of 14 - this is her last chance to translate that ability into record sales, and she is desperate to grab it.'
Indeed for Siobhán - a cousin of Kerry footballer Kieran Donaghy, who was raised in London by her Irish parents, Linda and Charlie - it represents a golden opportunity for one of the most underrated talents of her generation to finally garner the recognition she deserves.
Unable to use the name Sugababes for legal reasons (the latest manufactured incarnation of the group continue to stumble along with ever-diminishing chart returns) they are reuniting under the pragmatic moniker Mutya Keisha Siobhán, or MKS for short.
Posing up: The girls have been spending more and more time together since announcing their big comeback under the new moniker last week
Posing up: The girls have been spending more and more time together since announcing their big comeback under the new moniker last week
And if it sounds unwieldy, industry insiders say that the equality of their name bodes nothing but well.
'Make no mistake, this is no flash-in-the-pan vanity project,' says a senior industry source and self-confessed admirer. 'They've signed a deal with Polydor for a ton of money and there's a real buzz around them.
'Labels don't take punts on outside bets these days. You can rest assured that they've done their research and have a solid reason to believe this group is going to sell a lot of records.
'People underestimate just how much these girls achieved from a ridiculously young age. They were 13 or 14 when they got together, but they co-wrote all their songs and were being nominated for awards from the very beginning.
Comeback: The girls have so far only been seen in these promotional shots but have since been taking to Twitter to show what good friends they are again
Comeback: The girls have so far only been seen in these promotional shots but have since been taking to Twitter to show what good friends they are again
'Sure, they made some mistakes, and Siobhán was undoubtedly the casualty of that. But they're in their late-20s now, and they have the experience of artists twice their age. I really can't see them repeating the errors of the past.'
Avoiding those problems certainly seems to be uppermost in their minds, as Keisha herself confirmed last week.
'We've had discussions,' she said. 'We have a way of working: we trust each other. We look after each other. We are genuinely there for each other. If we were unhappy we'd tell each other and we'd figure it out, between ourselves.' And while some have voiced cynicism about the motives for this sudden rapprochement (none has any obvious source of income these days) sources who have worked with the three say that relations are 'genuinely warm and positive'.
Here they are! Mutya Keisha Siobhan pose up in their first official picture, after revealing their new name yesterday
Here they are! Mutya Keisha Siobhan pose up in their first official picture, after revealing their new name yesterday
Originally formed in 1998, the current incarnation of the Sugababes contains no original members.
Their last two albums are the only ones in the band's history to fail to reach gold status, and the most recent one was a bona fide turkey. Such is their dire state that the group are now officially 'on hiatus' with no plans to release any music before the end of 2013.
All of which must be music to the ears of Siobhán, who left the group just at the point when they were about to take the music business by storm.
It was during a promotional tour of Japan that she walked out - excusing herself on the pretext of going to the bathroom, but instead heading for the airport and catching the first flight home. Recalling that day, Siobhán later said that she 'took the decision to make myself happy'. Such was her animosity towards the others that for years she refused to even speak to Keisha.
To coin her own words: 'At [that] point I was happy never to work again. I had got to the point where I'd look in the mirror and not know who I was. I felt like I didn't have a personality. I'd lost my identity. I felt like a zombie. A dead person.'
Larking around: The trio appear to have put any former differences behind them to concentrate on their musical comeback
Larking around: The trio appear to have put any former differences behind them to concentrate on their musical comeback
Larking around: The trio appear to have put any former differences behind them to concentrate on their musical comeback
It gets worse: 'You know all those photos of us refusing to smile? I was just really unhappy and I couldn't be a***d.' No longer. These days Siobhán is an altogether more self-confident individual, and despite notions of failure she has maintained an impressive body of work ever since leaving the Sugababes.
Still aged only 19, she released her first solo album Revolution In Me in 2003, which was a critical success but failed to shift as many copies as the glowing reviews suggested it would.
The commercial failure of that record led to a parting of the ways with London Records. Siobhán, still a young and somewhat contrary individual, brashly blamed the problems on poor marketing and promotion.
Nevertheless, she had no problems securing another deal, this time with Parlophone, who demonstrated their faith in her talent by giving her free rein to record her follow-up album however she saw fit. This resulted in Siobhán holing up in a studio in northern France and producing Ghosts in 2007 - a contemplative album which once again wowed the critics but sold slowly. 'Siobhán has always had industry support and she's lived a great lifestyle for somebody the public rightly don't recognise as a star these days,' says the industry source.
As they were: The girls haven't released anything together as a trio since 2000 but are currently working on their new album
As they were: The girls haven't released anything together as a trio since 2000 but are currently working on their new album
'She's got a nice place in east London, dresses in designer clothes all the time and gets invited to all the big events.
'Her talent counts for a lot, and she is treated with respect because there has always been a sense that one day the world will see what we in the business have recognised since day one. Siobhán is a star. She just needs a chance to shine - and it looks like she's finally going to get it.'
After her second solo release struggled in the charts, Siobhán took a role on the West End stage, appearing in a successful production of Rent in early 2008.
Despite her apparent travails, friends say she has never wanted for self-belief, something they attribute to her upbringing by first generation Irish-immigrant parents.
Siobhán has always been extremely close to her sisters, Bevin and Róisín (who for many years has worked as her personal make-up artist) and, as one friend puts it, 'was raised to believe that if you work hard then everything will fall into place'.
Back in the day: Aged only 19, she released her first solo album Revolution In Me in 2003 - but it didn't reach commercial success
Back in the day: Aged only 19, she released her first solo album Revolution In Me in 2003 - but it didn't reach commercial success
This attitude has paid dividends as, even after two failed solo albums, she still quietly went on to sign another recording contract in 2009, with industry giants EMI.
As she blithely put it: 'As long as you're confident you can make a great record, you'll get a deal. I've never considered doing anything else. I got my first manager when I was 12 and signed my first deal when I was 14 with the Sugababes. I've never known anything else.'
It is a fact rarely acknowledged that when the Sugababes recorded their debut single the producer, Cameron McVey, insisted that Siobhán sing the lead vocal.
Even at 14, it seems, she was marked out for a greatness which has so far eluded her.
More recently she has struck up a lucrative sideline as a DJ in various fashionable London venues (she has a fiercely loyal gay fanbase which has never dwindled) and earned more than enough money to holiday in style several times a year.
This year alone she has been away twice, and when at home has enjoyed her pick of invitations to society events. During the Chelsea Flower Show in London she was given the full celebrity treatment, posing happily for the cameras with her good friend Denise Van Outen.
Friends say she is 'very happy' with her long-term boyfriend, who works in the business, but is in no hurry to settle down. There is unfinished business - something she hopes to settle up in the near future.
Work was well underway on another solo album when the offer came to rejoin her old bandmates. (Keisha had abruptly left the Sugababes in 2009, once again amid dark mutterings from bandmates of bullying on her part.)
Mutya, who had parted company with the group in 2005, began busily building bridges and despite failing in a court bid to reclaim the Sugababes name, by the time 2011 dawned there were strong whispers of a reunion.
That it has taken until now is evidence of the bad blood which previously poisoned the band. But after a series of tentative meetings, bridges were built and Siobhán - the final piece in the jigsaw - was finally persuaded to return.
All of which is great news for their fans, who are now eagerly anticipating a new release before the summer is out. These days the three of them are barely out of each other's company. Publicity shots for the new project depict a trio who are comfortable together, in a manner reminiscent of the schoolgirls they were when they first got together.
The reality, however, is rather more hard-nosed than that. While they have been having great fun in the studio this week, behind the scenes the reunion is secured by a watertight deal.
In May, they set up a Limited Liability Partnership to share the spoils of their venture. The name, titled Sacred Three, is the only remotely romantic aspect. For, as Siobhán learned to her cost the last time around, playground allegiances are no basis for lasting happiness.
Forget the PR spin: this is strictly business, and business is good.


Read more: http://www.dailymail.co.uk/tvshowbiz/article-2181532/Sugababes-reunion-Just-Siobh-n-Donaghy-reunite-Keisha-Mutya.html#ixzz22F8fVwNm